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New Noise, a daily genre-curated mixtape project, will launch on Monday, April 29th, 2013.
The focus of this project is to shed light on new and emerging artists by showcasing them within the context of mixtapes containing between 9-12 tracks, with each tape revolving around a general or “surface” genre. For each tape, a tracklist with artist names, links, and any other pertinent information will be provided.
Weekly breakdown:
MONDAY: Rock
TUESDAY: Electronic
WEDNESDAY: Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter
THURSDAY: Experimental/Other
FRIDAY: Rap/Hip-Hop
New Noise is open to any and all submissions from artists and we try to curate these tapes in an unbiased, community-minded way. If you are interested in having your music featured on New Noise, please email us.
Follow us on Twitter / Facebook

New Noise, a daily genre-curated mixtape project, will launch on Monday, April 29th, 2013.

The focus of this project is to shed light on new and emerging artists by showcasing them within the context of mixtapes containing between 9-12 tracks, with each tape revolving around a general or “surface” genre. For each tape, a tracklist with artist names, links, and any other pertinent information will be provided.

Weekly breakdown:

MONDAY: Rock

TUESDAY: Electronic

WEDNESDAY: Acoustic/Singer-Songwriter

THURSDAY: Experimental/Other

FRIDAY: Rap/Hip-Hop

New Noise is open to any and all submissions from artists and we try to curate these tapes in an unbiased, community-minded way. If you are interested in having your music featured on New Noise, please email us.

Follow us on Twitter / Facebook

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neighborhoodthreat:

Sick of listicles? Sick of Rihanna’s Instagram feed? Sick of bad music writing? Sick of bullshit? Well, get ready for UNCOOL.

Support better music journalism/publishing! And for the more visually-minded music enthusiast : TEPSIC MAGAZINE.

neighborhoodthreat:

Sick of listicles? Sick of Rihanna’s Instagram feed? Sick of bad music writing? Sick of bullshit? Well, get ready for UNCOOL.

Support better music journalism/publishing! And for the more visually-minded music enthusiast : TEPSIC MAGAZINE.

vialink

QUICK UPDATE:

Still putting together a roster of writers / figuring out re-design logistics / looking at a post-New Years relaunch in 2013.

STAY TUNED!

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Get @ Us on Twitter!

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BACK FROM THE DEAD - AN ALBUM A DAY KEEPS DEATH AT BAY WILL RETURN SOON
This is a P.S.A. I’m planning on rebooting/revamping An Album A Day and I’m hungry for some new talent to help out with providing reviews, finding new/emerging music to showcase, and to deliver the best possible content for our audience going forward. If you’re an aspiring writer who wants to get exposure, please contact me via Tumblr with an email address and a brief description of yourself, your favorite artists/bands, and your aspirations as a writer. I’m looking for up to 4 writer’s to come onboard and write for the site - I’ll reach out to you if I think you’re a fit for what we’re trying to accomplish here. After a long hiatus, I’m excited to resuscitate An Album A Day and get the ball rolling again. In the meantime, follow my main blog Neighborhood Threat and I’ll see you all back here very soon.
Best,-M 

BACK FROM THE DEAD - AN ALBUM A DAY KEEPS DEATH AT BAY WILL RETURN SOON

This is a P.S.A. I’m planning on rebooting/revamping An Album A Day and I’m hungry for some new talent to help out with providing reviews, finding new/emerging music to showcase, and to deliver the best possible content for our audience going forward. If you’re an aspiring writer who wants to get exposure, please contact me via Tumblr with an email address and a brief description of yourself, your favorite artists/bands, and your aspirations as a writer. I’m looking for up to 4 writer’s to come onboard and write for the site - I’ll reach out to you if I think you’re a fit for what we’re trying to accomplish here. After a long hiatus, I’m excited to resuscitate An Album A Day and get the ball rolling again. In the meantime, follow my main blog Neighborhood Threat and I’ll see you all back here very soon.

Best,
-M 

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As I’m sure you’ve all guessed…

An Album A Day Keeps Death at Bay is somewhat, well, dead. It has been more or less for the last six months and I apologize for not posting this notice earlier. It has nothing to do with RIAA warnings or any sort of legal recourse from an outside party, moreso it has to do with my lack of time/motivation to continue working on this blog. This does not mean I have stopped entirely, though. On my main blog, Neighborhood Threat, I’ve carried on the short-form music essay style that this blog came to be known for, as well as posting pertinent and live links to downloads of new music. I plan on continuing with this for as long as I can without interruption.

Truthfully, I just lost my mojo to generate exciting and new content, but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to find and share music and writing with you all. At the current stage, my main Tumblr page is my homebase and the blog you should be following for all things that this blog once offered. Looking ahead, I want it to be known that this blog will return in a completely rebooted and reformatted version with much more interactive and exclusive content that will cater to both musicologists, fans, critical listeners, writers, and more. Until then, I want to thank the 1000+ followers who stuck with me this long and helped make this blog mean something. This site was created because I wanted to share both great music and great decent* prose as a way of unifying people to an idea as much to one another, and as Shakespeare said, “If music be the food of love, play on.” This website born out of a labor of love and was intended to direct readers and users to the history behind the music I and many others love. The response was overwhelmingly positive and helped me to learn a great deal about my own writing and my love of music. Granted that many times there was a distinct lack of copy-editing, but that’s how it goes when you’re a bored and overeducated college student. But each of these essays was intended to be short and sweet, like a treat, with a little bonus to boot: a download link. There was never any intention to impress and the fact that you all were so complimentary and helpful to the whole process made it that much more worth it. So An Album A Day Keeps Death at Bay will live on in various permutations until I get officially cracking on the rebuild. Until then, it’s all quiet on the Western front.

You’ve all been stellar and as influential as I could hope this blog has been for all of you, and it’s not like I’ve gone away entirely. Again, check out my main blog Neighborhood Threat which will offer a lot of the same content you can find here, interspersed with other Tumblr-friendly links, images, words, and fodder. As always, the archive for An Album A Day will remain but there will be no new content until the rebuild.

Thanks for an interesting a positive experience over the last year and I’m sure I’ll see you all around the ‘Net,

-Max

P.S. You can still contact me thru the email for this blog here if you have any comments/requests/just wanna chat, and you can also hit me up/add me on Twitter and via the Facebook Fan Page. -M

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Take one part Tom Waits, add a dash of Dylan-mysticism, center it around Bomb Squad-esque production and you might have something remotely close to Tricky’s Maxinquaye (1995). Not that any of those things aren’t part of the strange surrealist collage that pulses and thuds along, but it is Maxinquaye's sonic hallmarks, hedging slightly on the pre-millennial paranoia (later addressed in Tricky's catalogue) that makes the album such a rich and textured happening. “Brand New You're Retro” squeeks and rusts like a brand new toy, whereas other tracks like obvious go-to of “Black Steel” or charming slunk and smolder of “Hell Is Just Around the Corner”. For a debut, Maxinquaye sets up a gold standard that Tricky and co-pilot Martina Topley Bird first examined during the initial wave with their most closely associate act, Massive Attack. But it is within the overarching contextual history, with movies like oft-forgotten Shopping (1994) and headscratchingly dull though oddly prescient one-offs like Johnny Nmemonic (1995) that back up the albums aesthetic approach just as much as its timeless grasping at progressive anything. Truly an electric if not cybernetically juicy debut, Maxinquaye is an early look at what, if anything, humankind and musickind has become.
Listen to “Brand New You’re Retro" and "Abbaon Fat Track" (Live, 1999)Download “Maxinquaye" 

Take one part Tom Waits, add a dash of Dylan-mysticism, center it around Bomb Squad-esque production and you might have something remotely close to Tricky’s Maxinquaye (1995). Not that any of those things aren’t part of the strange surrealist collage that pulses and thuds along, but it is Maxinquaye's sonic hallmarks, hedging slightly on the pre-millennial paranoia (later addressed in Tricky's catalogue) that makes the album such a rich and textured happening. “Brand New You're Retro” squeeks and rusts like a brand new toy, whereas other tracks like obvious go-to of “Black Steel” or charming slunk and smolder of “Hell Is Just Around the Corner”. For a debut, Maxinquaye sets up a gold standard that Tricky and co-pilot Martina Topley Bird first examined during the initial wave with their most closely associate act, Massive Attack. But it is within the overarching contextual history, with movies like oft-forgotten Shopping (1994) and headscratchingly dull though oddly prescient one-offs like Johnny Nmemonic (1995) that back up the albums aesthetic approach just as much as its timeless grasping at progressive anything. Truly an electric if not cybernetically juicy debut, Maxinquaye is an early look at what, if anything, humankind and musickind has become.

Listen to “Brand New You’re Retro" and "Abbaon Fat Track" (Live, 1999)
Download “Maxinquaye

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By it’s very definition, stoner rock is a misnomer—think of your favorite song; did the writer(s) do it under the influence of some sort of illicit substance. If it appeared, well, ever, then likelihood has it that there was some sort of extra-human substance or influence involved. That being said, somewhere within the dumb post-grunge millennial hoopla that swept and consumed modern rock, Queens of the Stone Age’s second album, the aptly titled Rated R (2000), was lumped in with a genre that creaked and groaned with a certain desert-fried intelligence and history, unlike the ham-fisted rock typification in fashion at the time. Meaty while simultaneously sparse and mysterious, Homme, Oliveri & Co. produced a wholly unique creation. As Dr. Hunter S. Thompson said of this singularity, “A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.” And if any band embodied that almost literary sense of difference, it was the Queens; having already produced a masterful and sonically duplicitous (though entirely self-aware self-titled debut), Rated R, here reissued with a slew of b-sides and a recorded live set from their rookie years, stands by the original tracklisting—still packing a one-two barfight knockout. So, while Homme has risen to the level of artful coordinator of riffage since his Kyuss days, Rated R stands as a testament to his power as both a band leader and somewhat of a stylistic guide to the band. Oliveri, matching him in wit but out-classing him in aggression, plays to his counterparts strength as a songwriter, and Homme to him. Queens declared the “unofficial party anthem” of the year 2000 with the minor modern-rock charter, “Feel Good Hit of the Summer”, but it is the sly, extremely referential but never apish, non-considered tracks like “Better Living Through Chemistry” or the Lanegan-delivered “Auto Pilot” that would quickly become crowd favorites together and separate of their boldly melancholic yet informed sentiments. Queens fused fused their identity as both the figure head for that moniker unwanted but not unwelcomed at the turn of the century; as grunge gave way to a much more fraternity sensibility, and rock turned its back on those that had grown-up with a generational fissure in music and culture and instead got in bed with heavily produced schlock, the band bounced playful alongside the genre, never refuting it or denying, confirming or disproving, and Rated R is their stand: fly the freak flag high.
Download “Rated R Deluxe Edition”Listen to “Auto Pilot" (Live in Sweden, 2003) and "Monsters in the Parasol" 

By it’s very definition, stoner rock is a misnomer—think of your favorite song; did the writer(s) do it under the influence of some sort of illicit substance. If it appeared, well, ever, then likelihood has it that there was some sort of extra-human substance or influence involved. That being said, somewhere within the dumb post-grunge millennial hoopla that swept and consumed modern rock, Queens of the Stone Age’s second album, the aptly titled Rated R (2000), was lumped in with a genre that creaked and groaned with a certain desert-fried intelligence and history, unlike the ham-fisted rock typification in fashion at the time. Meaty while simultaneously sparse and mysterious, Homme, Oliveri & Co. produced a wholly unique creation. As Dr. Hunter S. Thompson said of this singularity, “A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.” And if any band embodied that almost literary sense of difference, it was the Queens; having already produced a masterful and sonically duplicitous (though entirely self-aware self-titled debut), Rated R, here reissued with a slew of b-sides and a recorded live set from their rookie years, stands by the original tracklisting—still packing a one-two barfight knockout. So, while Homme has risen to the level of artful coordinator of riffage since his Kyuss days, Rated R stands as a testament to his power as both a band leader and somewhat of a stylistic guide to the band. Oliveri, matching him in wit but out-classing him in aggression, plays to his counterparts strength as a songwriter, and Homme to him. Queens declared the “unofficial party anthem” of the year 2000 with the minor modern-rock charter, “Feel Good Hit of the Summer”, but it is the sly, extremely referential but never apish, non-considered tracks like “Better Living Through Chemistry” or the Lanegan-delivered “Auto Pilot” that would quickly become crowd favorites together and separate of their boldly melancholic yet informed sentiments. Queens fused fused their identity as both the figure head for that moniker unwanted but not unwelcomed at the turn of the century; as grunge gave way to a much more fraternity sensibility, and rock turned its back on those that had grown-up with a generational fissure in music and culture and instead got in bed with heavily produced schlock, the band bounced playful alongside the genre, never refuting it or denying, confirming or disproving, and Rated R is their stand: fly the freak flag high.

Download “Rated R Deluxe Edition
Listen to “Auto Pilot" (Live in Sweden, 2003) and "Monsters in the Parasol

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We’re back - Click through to recommend An Album a Day for Tumblr Tuesday!

We’re back - Click through to recommend An Album a Day for Tumblr Tuesday!

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Short and sweet, The Upholsterers one and only single, Makers of High Grade Suites (2000), may be something of a footnote for one half of the duo (the indomitable Jack White), but it is an almost perfect encapsulation of the raw and unbridled fury of turn-of-the-century garage rock. Perfectly reimagined blues classics such as Willie Dixon’s “Ain’t Superstitious” and oddball outsider Jack Starr’s “Pain (Gimme Sympathy)” stand strongly along side the strangely compelling White composition, “Apple of My Eye”. Characteristic of White’s playing and style, the album is loud and crunchy, lo-fi, but perfectly audible. Bandmate and White’s former upholstery teacher, Brian Muldoon sets down an easy and gritty backing with his keen drumming, but as always, White’s guitar takes the focal point. If the White Stripes hadn’t worked out, we still would’ve heard White one way or another, and Makers of High Grade Suites simply attests to that.
Listen to “Apple of My Eye”Download “Makers of High Grade Suites" 
P.S. 200th post! It’s good to be back.

Short and sweet, The Upholsterers one and only single, Makers of High Grade Suites (2000), may be something of a footnote for one half of the duo (the indomitable Jack White), but it is an almost perfect encapsulation of the raw and unbridled fury of turn-of-the-century garage rock. Perfectly reimagined blues classics such as Willie Dixon’s “Ain’t Superstitious” and oddball outsider Jack Starr’s “Pain (Gimme Sympathy)” stand strongly along side the strangely compelling White composition, “Apple of My Eye”. Characteristic of White’s playing and style, the album is loud and crunchy, lo-fi, but perfectly audible. Bandmate and White’s former upholstery teacher, Brian Muldoon sets down an easy and gritty backing with his keen drumming, but as always, White’s guitar takes the focal point. If the White Stripes hadn’t worked out, we still would’ve heard White one way or another, and Makers of High Grade Suites simply attests to that.

Listen to “Apple of My Eye
Download “Makers of High Grade Suites

P.S. 200th post! It’s good to be back.

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All links to downloads are not owned or hosted by this site. The content of these links are the copyrighted materials and property of their creators and their owners. I post these links and summaries in an effort to enlighten and share music, not to proliferate illegal activities. Please go out and buy the music of these artists and support your local record stores. Thank you.